Sequencing and Patterning

These types of activities don’t always need to be drawn or written. Here are some simple ideas of what you can do with coloured lids.

Try finding and making patterns at home. For example, you could do it with things from the garden (leaf, stone, leaf, stone), clothing (sock, sock, shoe, sock, sock, shoe), toys (car, block, block, car, block, block), cutlery (spoon, fork, knife, spoon, fork, knife) or clapping patterns (clap, clap, stamp, stamp) for your child to join in with or copy. Have fun with patterns and see how your child starts to become more aware of patterns around you.

As always, you will see that the final photo describes one of the vital foundational skills that this type of activity is developing. You can see that by engaging with your child in fun activities, you are not just keeping them busy, but are helping to prepare them for ‘big school’.